Dry needling

Dry needling

Is a technique designed to treat muscular pain and dysfunction.
 “Myofacial trigger points” (Muscle knots) are relaxed through the targeted pricking with a needle inside the muscle. 
 
It should be noted that dry needling is not the same as acupuncture, which is a completely different technique. Acupuncture often involves inserting several needles into the skin, which remain there for some time. In dry needling nothing is being injected into the body and that’s why the term “dry” is used.
 
What is a trigger point and what do you feel?
A trigger point is a painful spot in a tight muscle that, in addition to local pain, can often cause distant referred pain. Thus, you might feel the pain in a different place from where we determine the cause of this pain.
What is a trigger point and what do you feel?
A trigger point is a painful spot in a tight muscle that, in addition to local pain, can often cause distant referred pain. Thus, you might feel the pain in a different place from where we determine the cause of this pain.
 
Why do we develop a trigger point?
  • Acute: due to a wrong movement or accident
  • Chronic:
    • due to long-term incorrect posture or overload injury
    • after immobilization, for example; cast
    • psychological factors; stress, depression, anxiety and fatigue
    • chronic infections and allergies
How?
The Physiotherapist identifies the trigger points first by palpation according to the patients complaints and history. inserts the needle into the trigger points (knots) located inside the muscle in order to release it and cause pain relief and improved function.
 
Why Dry Needling?
The treatment is aimed at deactivating the trigger points. The trigger point is loosened by targeted pricking with a needle. If the complaints last longer, more muscles are usually involved.  After the treatments you will receive exercises for at home and specific advice to maintain mobility. Dry Needling is never a stand-alone treatment. It will always be combined with other manual therapeutic techniques or exercises.
 
What will you feel during treatment?
When the trigger point is punctured, the muscle may tighten briefly. This gives a kind of cramping feeling (a twitch) for a short time and can be accompanied by some local pain and sometimes also distal pain. The pain might remain for two-three days which will slowly decrease. This is a completely normal reaction 
 

More questions about this interesting technique? Ask Mayse & Isabel